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Spotted-tail Quoll photographed again in February at the Grampians

Spotted-tail Quoll photographed again in February at the Grampians

Photo by: Parks Victoria

The Grampians Quoll spotted again

Monday 24 February, 2014

Parks Victoria rangers in the Grampians National Park are excited to report another picture of a Spotted-tail Quoll, otherwise known as the Tiger Quoll. The latest image of a large quoll was captured in early February at 1:37am.  

Ranger in Charge Dave Roberts said it was the second photo of a quoll recorded in the Grampians in the last six months, after the species was thought to be extinct in the area for over 140 years.  The latest quoll was ‘caught’ on remote cameras set up to monitor the Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby population.  

“We can’t confirm this image is the same quoll that was captured on camera in October last year. However, the image was captured from the same camera where the first quoll was pictured, so we know this quoll was travelling through the same part of the park where a quoll has been previously detected.”  

“The recent fire in the northern areas of the Grampians has not harmed the reintroduced Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby population, with all animals accounted for,” said Mr Roberts.  

“It’s also very exciting that we’ve captured another photo of a Spotted-tail Quoll, as we begin the recovery process in other parts of the park.”   Program Coordinator Ryan Duffy said the origin of the animal is still unknown, but signs were good for the success of the pest animal programs.  

“We have been undertaking extensive fox control and other conservation works across this landscape for decades, and we know those efforts are paying off. The Grampians Ark fox control program helps the survival of threatened mammal species like the Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby. The quoll has appeared in the area of the Grampians that has the least foxes, near the wallaby colony.”  

“It is a great sign that this native carnivore can persist in this landscape, particularly as the Grampians has experienced multiple fires and floods in recent years. In a time of fire recovery, it’s great to have these symbols of survival and resilience.”

Spotted-tail Quoll are endangered in Victoria, with the south-east Australian population endangered nationally and listed as 'near threatened' on the International Union for Conservation of Nature red list.

Parks Victoria has refined monitoring techniques in an effort to gain an understanding of the origin of Spotted-tail Quolls in the Grampians National Park and the range over which they are roaming, following several unconfirmed sightings over the years.



Media enquiries

Zoe Furman


Parks Victoria media centre

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