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Grampians Spotted-tail Quoll

Grampians Spotted-tail Quoll

1 year ago from Parks Victoria

Tiger Quoll spotted in the Grampians National Park after 141 years

Friday 4 October, 2013

Presumed locally extinct for 141 years, a Tiger Quoll has been caught on remote digital camera in the Grampians National Park. The animal was captured on cameras set up to monitor the Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby population. The Tiger Quoll, also known as the Spotted-tail Quoll, is a carnivorous marsupial native to Australia.

Parks Victoria’s Manager of the Grampians Ark fox control program, Ben Holmes said: "I honestly couldn't believe my eyes when the photos were sent through from our field crew. There is no mistaking the spotted body colour, which can only be a quoll."

The sighting is the first confirmed live record of a Tiger Quoll in the Grampians National Park since 1872, after an animal was killed at the headwaters of the Glenelg River.

Grampians National Park Ranger in Charge Dave Roberts said this was is an exciting find for all staff who had worked on conservation programs in the Grampians over the years.

“We have been undertaking extensive fire management, fox control and other conservation works for decades and this sighting adds to our knowledge and importance of our work to conserve these species,” said Mr Roberts. “Having a native predator in the system is a great sign that the park is supporting a healthy, functioning ecosystem.”

Tiger Quolls are endangered in Victoria, with the south-east Australian population endangered nationally and listed as 'near threatened' on the International Union for Conservation of Nature red list.

Parks Victoria will now refine camera monitoring techniques to hopefully build a better picture of how widespread the population is across the Grampians National Park, following several unconfirmed sightings over the years.

Parks Victoria Chief Executive Bill Jackson said: “This is an extremely exciting rediscovery after such a long time, which highlights the critical role parks play in conserving Victoria’s unique biodiversity.”

“Victoria’s parks conserve examples of over 80% of Victoria’s plants and animals and this rediscovery confirms the Grampians National Park as stronghold for biodiversity conservation.”

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