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Inland waters and wetlands

Pelicans (photo: Fiona Smith)

Pelicans (photo: Fiona Smith)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Inland waters and wetlands

Eastern Banjo Frog (Photo: J.Tscharke)

Eastern Banjo Frog (Photo: J.Tscharke)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Inland waters and wetlands

Wetland (Photo: Arthur Mostead)

Wetland (Photo: Arthur Mostead)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Inland waters and wetlands

Victoria has a rich variety of inland and estuarine aquatic environments, including flowing waters such as creeks, streams and rivers; and standing waters such as lakes and wetlands. These waters can be permanent or ephemeral, such as intermittently flooded wetlands and red gum floodplains.

Inland waters and wetlands provide habitat for a variety of animals. Some species such as fish and frogs require water throughout their life cycle, some may use aquatic areas for a specific stage of their life cycle (e.g. birds and amphibians), while others may require aquatic environments for resources such as food or as a corridor for movement. The right conditions can result in large and spectacular breeding colonies.

The forest canopy of tall eucalypts, large wattles and broad-leafed shrubs supports 80 per cent of Victoria's possums, gliders and bats and most of the common forest birds and arboreal skinks. The river banks and the rivers themselves support a vast range of invertebrates providing a food source for many native species, including platypus and water rats, kingfishers and swallows, frogs, fish, water skinks and snakes.

More about inland waters and wetlands

  • There are over 17,000 wetlands larger than 1ha in Victoria
  • Inland waters and wetlands, coupled with the surrounding land, support natural processes that purify water while cycling nutrients and sediments
  • They provide important focal points for recreation, tourism and cultural enrichment.

Key Threats

  • Changes to flow regimes
  • Frequency and intensity of flooding – flooding is necessary to provide moisture for the germination and survival of red gum seeds
  • Particularly prone to weed invasion.

Where to see inland waters and wetlands

Greg Shelton Click to view the news RSS feed.

NAIDOC week: ranger Greg Shelton talks Country

17 Jul 2017

2-9 July is NAIDOC Week, when Australia celebrates the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.The stunning south west of Victoria is a great place to experience rich Aboriginal Cultural History throughout the World Heritage listed Budj Bim region, home to the Gundtjmara people for many…

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National Tree Day

30 Jul 2017 10:00am-2:30pm

To celebrate National Tree Day, help Friends of the Prom plant trees at Tidal River, Wilsons Promontory National Park. There will be a barbecue lunch provided.

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Koala Conservation Day

6 Aug 2017 9:00am-3:00pm

Enjoy a day in the outdoors, connecting with nature and helping koalas in the You Yangs Regional Park and the Western Plains near Melbourne. You will search for koalas, take walks through bushland with naturalists and remove weeds and plant trees for koala habitat, in the company of a highly…

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Koala Conservation Day

20 Aug 2017 9:00am-3:00pm

Enjoy a day in the outdoors, connecting with nature and helping koalas in the You Yangs Regional Park and the Western Plains near Melbourne. You will search for koalas, take walks through bushland with naturalists and remove weeds and plant trees for koala habitat, in the company of a highly…

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Peak Adventure Winter Series Race 3

27 Aug 2017 7:30am-12:30pm

Peak Adventure is excited to bring you PAWS, the Peak Adventure Winter Series at Lysterfield Park. Keep motivated, fit and healthy this winter by joining us for either an off-road triathlon, or an off-road duathlon. The triathlon includes a 7km paddle, a 20km MTB, and an 8km trail run. The…