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The mallee

Belah Woodland (Photo: P.Sandell)

Belah Woodland (Photo: P.Sandell)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: The mallee

Desert Baeckea (Photo: Mark Antos)

Desert Baeckea (Photo: Mark Antos)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: The mallee

Bandy Bandy (Photo: J.Tscharke)

Bandy Bandy (Photo: J.Tscharke)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: The mallee

Wyperfeld. Photo: Mark Antos

Wyperfeld. Photo: Mark Antos

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: The mallee

Bluebush, Murray-Sunset NP. Photo: P.Sandell

Bluebush, Murray-Sunset NP. Photo: P.Sandell

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: The mallee

Mallee ecosystems take their name from the small, multi-stemmed eucalypts which feature lignotubers (mallee roots) just below the soil surface, which store carbohydrates and water, and allow the tree to reshoot from the base if stems are destroyed by fire.

The blanket of sandy soil which characterises the mallee, has created a gentle scenery and superficially simple landscape, with species of mallee and understorey of saltbush, heathy shrubs, sedges, grasses or ephemeral herbs varying subtly according to soil type, depth and salinity.

More about the mallee:

  • Low, unreliable rainfall, high summer temperatures and poor fertility of the sandy soils are a key characteristic – leading some parts to be called ‘deserts’
  • Surprisingly diverse flora and fauna including many species of reptiles
  • Small nocturnal ground-dwelling mammals use burrows for breeding and protection
  • Has a distinctive range of birds including the Mallee Fowl which constructs huge mounds of sand and litter to incubate its eggs
  • Parrots are prominent, including the colourful Mallee Ringneck, Major Mitchell Cockatoo and Regent parrot.

Key Threats

  • Grazing by exotic animals (e.g. rabbits, goats)
  • Predation by foxes
  • Weed invasion
  • Increased temperatures and decreased rainfall are potential threats to species that already ‘live on the edge’
  • A potential increase in the frequency of large, intense fire events is also a threat to species that require ‘old-growth’ habitat.

Where to see the mallee

Sam Griffiths Click to view the news RSS feed.

Lorne Ranger retires after 35 years

19 May 2017

It was one of those pivotal moments. Back in 1982, 30 year old Sam Griffiths needed a job and took on a temporary role as a summer crew ranger. It wasn’t long before he realised he loved working in the outdoors and felt inspired by the dedication of his crew.…

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Melbourne Coastrek

26 May 2017 6:00am-10:00pm

Melbourne Coastrek is an annual 30km - 60km team trekking challenge held along the Mornington Peninsula's stunning coastline raising money for The Fred Hollows Foundation. Hosted by Wild Women On Top, it’s one of the most picturesque endurance events in Australia, including ocean and bay beaches and views, headlands, cliff…

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Melbourne Coastrek

26 May 2017 6:00am-10:00pm

Melbourne Coastrek is an annual 30km - 60km team trekking challenge held along the Mornington Peninsula's stunning coastline raising money for The Fred Hollows Foundation. Hosted by Wild Women On Top, it’s one of the most picturesque endurance events in Australia, including ocean and bay beaches and views, headlands, cliff…

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Werribee Park Autumn Plant Sale

27 May 2017 10:00am-3:00pm

Over 1600 trees, plants and herbs for sale. Proceeds to Werribee Park volunteer groups. Enter via Gate 2 - Main Visitors Car Park

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Friends of Glen Nayook working bee

28 May 2017 9:00am-11:00am

You are cordially invited to attend Friends of Glen Nayook's next working bee. The focus will be on removing debris and clearing overhead branches on the bottom loop and if time permits, clean up in the carpark area. It would be greatly appreciated if you brought along tools (loppers, rakes…