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Wet forests and rainforest

Powerful Owl (Photo: J. Tscharke)

Powerful Owl (Photo: J. Tscharke)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

Bracket Fungus (Photo: Mark Antos)

Bracket Fungus (Photo: Mark Antos)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

Central Highlands Spiny Crayfish (photo: M. Antos)

Central Highlands Spiny Crayfish (photo: M. Antos)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

The cool mountains and gullies of ranges in southern, central and north-eastern Victoria as well as areas at lower elevations are dominated by wet eucalypt forests and rainforests.

The wet eucalypt forests have Victoria’s tallest trees including the world’s largest flowering plant, the Mountain Ash which reaches up to 100 metres in height and 15 metres in circumference. This often grows in single species stands, but Messmate and Mountain Grey Gum, or Shining Gum and Alpine Ash at higher altitudes, and other eucalypts share the sky.

In rainforests and sheltered gullies a dense canopy of non-eucalypt tree species, climbers, broad-leafed shrubs and tree ferns provide umbrellas of shade for a variety of ferns, shrubs, mosses and myriad of other life-forms.

More about wet forests and rainforests

  • Generally Myrtle Beech rainforests only form once a wet eucalypt forest reaches maturity, which takes several hundred years to do so.
  • Trees in wet forests begin to develop hollows in trunks and larger branches after they are about 150 years old.
  • Possums (such as the rare Leadbeater’s Possum), gliders, bats, owls and many bird species require tree hollows or standing dead trees for nesting or roosting or both.

Key Threats

  • In young forests hollows are scarce resulting in less diverse and smaller populations of forest animals.
  • Many understorey plants flourish after fires and are often older than the dominant eucalypts which may be killed in an intense fire.
  • Weed infestation.
  • Predation of native animals by introduced species.
  • Phytophthora cinnamomi (fungal dieback).

Where to see wet forests and rainforests

geotechnical scientists Click to view the news RSS feed.

Seismic shift - investigations for better visitor views

25 Jul 2016

Visitors to the Twelve Apostles will see geotechnical scientists working in the area this week as part of the Victorian Government’s $9.8 million visitor infrastructure improvements program for the Shipwreck Coast. Castle Rock at the Twelve Apostles, the Blowhole at Loch Ard Gorge and Campbell’s Creek in Port Campbell have…

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Science In The Park: Wildlife Counts

14 Aug 2016 10:00am-3:00pm

Join PrimeSCI!; the LabRats Student Science Club for a day of fun hands on science activities. 'Young scientists' learn to identify and monitor local species of birds, frogs, koalas, ants and freshwater invertebrates. Or hear from researchers from Westernport Biosphere, Platypus Education Group and other presenters in the wetlands observatory.

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Friends of Glen Nayook working bee

25 Sep 2016 9:00am-11:00am

Loop track maintenance. Morning tea provided.

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Days Mill Open Day

25 Sep 2016 10:30am-1:30pm

The historic site will be open to the public as part of the Activities in the Park program supported by the City of Greater Shepparton. Come along to take a tour of the best preserved 19 century flour mill in Victoria and learn more about its history. The mill is…

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Friends of Glen Nayook working bee

6 Nov 2016 9:00am-11:00am

Maintenance and AGM. Morning tea provided.