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Wet forests and rainforest

Powerful Owl (Photo: J. Tscharke)

Powerful Owl (Photo: J. Tscharke)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

Bracket Fungus (Photo: Mark Antos)

Bracket Fungus (Photo: Mark Antos)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

Central Highlands Spiny Crayfish (photo: M. Antos)

Central Highlands Spiny Crayfish (photo: M. Antos)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

The cool mountains and gullies of ranges in southern, central and north-eastern Victoria as well as areas at lower elevations are dominated by wet eucalypt forests and rainforests.

The wet eucalypt forests have Victoria’s tallest trees including the world’s largest flowering plant, the Mountain Ash which reaches up to 100 metres in height and 15 metres in circumference. This often grows in single species stands, but Messmate and Mountain Grey Gum, or Shining Gum and Alpine Ash at higher altitudes, and other eucalypts share the sky.

In rainforests and sheltered gullies a dense canopy of non-eucalypt tree species, climbers, broad-leafed shrubs and tree ferns provide umbrellas of shade for a variety of ferns, shrubs, mosses and myriad of other life-forms.

More about wet forests and rainforests

  • Generally Myrtle Beech rainforests only form once a wet eucalypt forest reaches maturity, which takes several hundred years to do so.
  • Trees in wet forests begin to develop hollows in trunks and larger branches after they are about 150 years old.
  • Possums (such as the rare Leadbeater’s Possum), gliders, bats, owls and many bird species require tree hollows or standing dead trees for nesting or roosting or both.

Key Threats

  • In young forests hollows are scarce resulting in less diverse and smaller populations of forest animals.
  • Many understorey plants flourish after fires and are often older than the dominant eucalypts which may be killed in an intense fire.
  • Weed infestation.
  • Predation of native animals by introduced species.
  • Phytophthora cinnamomi (fungal dieback).

Where to see wet forests and rainforests

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Have your say on Devilbend watercraft access

20 Feb 2017

Parks Victoria is inviting the community to comment on plans to introduce non-powered recreational boating, including canoes and kayaks, in a section of Devilbend Natural Features Reserve. Devilbend Natural Features Reserve is recognised internationally for its importance in the conservation of bird populations. Over 44 species of birds call Devilbend…

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Herring Island Summer Arts Festival 2017

14 Jan 2017 - 17 Apr 2017

The Herring Island Summer Arts Festival 2017 presents a series of 4 exhibitions, by: Association of Sculptors of Victoria Basketmakers of Victoria Contemporary Art Society of Victoria A4 Art Australia The Gallery on Herring Island will be open every weekend from 14 January through 17 April, including Australia Day holiday…

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Wilsons Promontory Labour Day Weekend Discovery Program

11 Mar 2017 - 12 Mar 2017

Parks Victoria’s Discovery program encourages children and adults to explore Victoria’s parks with a ranger. Programs include a range of interactive and fun activities. Highlights of the Labour Discovery Program at the Prom include opportunities to: Join Marco Festa-Bianchet from the University of Sherbrooke, Quebec and University of Melbourne on…

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Multicultural Children's Picnic

22 Mar 2017 10:30am-1:00pm

The Children's Multicultural Picnic will be a celebration of different cultures and the enrichment this brings to children and family lives. A range of activities will be on offer with opportunities for families to participate and promote activities from their own culture and learn about other cultures. Held at Brimbank…