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Wet forests and rainforest

Powerful Owl (Photo: J. Tscharke)

Powerful Owl (Photo: J. Tscharke)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

Bracket Fungus (Photo: Mark Antos)

Bracket Fungus (Photo: Mark Antos)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

Central Highlands Spiny Crayfish (photo: M. Antos)

Central Highlands Spiny Crayfish (photo: M. Antos)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

The cool mountains and gullies of ranges in southern, central and north-eastern Victoria as well as areas at lower elevations are dominated by wet eucalypt forests and rainforests.

The wet eucalypt forests have Victoria’s tallest trees including the world’s largest flowering plant, the Mountain Ash which reaches up to 100 metres in height and 15 metres in circumference. This often grows in single species stands, but Messmate and Mountain Grey Gum, or Shining Gum and Alpine Ash at higher altitudes, and other eucalypts share the sky.

In rainforests and sheltered gullies a dense canopy of non-eucalypt tree species, climbers, broad-leafed shrubs and tree ferns provide umbrellas of shade for a variety of ferns, shrubs, mosses and myriad of other life-forms.

More about wet forests and rainforests

  • Generally Myrtle Beech rainforests only form once a wet eucalypt forest reaches maturity, which takes several hundred years to do so.
  • Trees in wet forests begin to develop hollows in trunks and larger branches after they are about 150 years old.
  • Possums (such as the rare Leadbeater’s Possum), gliders, bats, owls and many bird species require tree hollows or standing dead trees for nesting or roosting or both.

Key Threats

  • In young forests hollows are scarce resulting in less diverse and smaller populations of forest animals.
  • Many understorey plants flourish after fires and are often older than the dominant eucalypts which may be killed in an intense fire.
  • Weed infestation.
  • Predation of native animals by introduced species.
  • Phytophthora cinnamomi (fungal dieback).

Where to see wet forests and rainforests

Wimmera Heritage River Click to view the news RSS feed.

Please do not collect firewood from Wimmera Heritage River

19 May 2017

Parks Victoria is reminding the community that firewood collection and removal from the Wimmera Heritage River is not permitted.A fine and infringement notice has recently been issued after an individual was caught on remote camera illegally harvesting firewood from the area.Parks Victoria is seeking to raise awareness of the river’s…

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Federal Cave Tour

3 Jul 2017 3:00pm-4:00pm

This historical tour provides a unique opportunity to view a cave that is rarely open to the public and is part of the same cave system as the Royal and the Fairy show caves. Lit only by solar-powered pathway lights, you are provided with a helmet and headlight to view…

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Murrindal Cave Tour

4 Jul 2017 1:00pm-2:30pm

A rare opportunity to visit spectacular caves located to the north of Buchan. Be prepared for something very special. The tour requires a 14 km drive north of Buchan and a reasonable level of fitness. Discounts apply for multiple tours.

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Federal Cave Tour

4 Jul 2017 3:00pm-4:00pm

This historical tour provides a unique opportunity to view a cave that is rarely open to the public and is part of the same cave system as the Royal and the Fairy show caves. Lit only by solar-powered pathway lights, you are provided with a helmet and headlight to view…

Click to view RSS Feed

Federal Cave Tour

5 Jul 2017 3:00pm-4:00pm

This historical tour provides a unique opportunity to view a cave that is rarely open to the public and is part of the same cave system as the Royal and the Fairy show caves. Lit only by solar-powered pathway lights, you are provided with a helmet and headlight to view…