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Wet forests and rainforest

Powerful Owl (Photo: J. Tscharke)

Powerful Owl (Photo: J. Tscharke)

3 years ago from Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

Bracket Fungus (Photo: Mark Antos)

Bracket Fungus (Photo: Mark Antos)

3 years ago from Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

Central Highlands Spiny Crayfish (photo: M. Antos)

Central Highlands Spiny Crayfish (photo: M. Antos)

3 years ago from Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

The cool mountains and gullies of ranges in southern, central and north-eastern Victoria as well as areas at lower elevations are dominated by wet eucalypt forests and rainforests.

The wet eucalypt forests have Victoria’s tallest trees including the world’s largest flowering plant, the Mountain Ash which reaches up to 100 metres in height and 15 metres in circumference. This often grows in single species stands, but Messmate and Mountain Grey Gum, or Shining Gum and Alpine Ash at higher altitudes, and other eucalypts share the sky.

In rainforests and sheltered gullies a dense canopy of non-eucalypt tree species, climbers, broad-leafed shrubs and tree ferns provide umbrellas of shade for a variety of ferns, shrubs, mosses and myriad of other life-forms.

More about wet forests and rainforests

  • Generally Myrtle Beech rainforests only form once a wet eucalypt forest reaches maturity, which takes several hundred years to do so
  • Trees in wet forests begin to develop hollows in trunks and larger branches after they are about 150 years old
  • Possums (such as the rare Leadbeater’s Possum), gliders, bats, owls, bats, and many bird species require tree hollows or standing dead trees for nesting or roosting or both

Key Threats

  • In young forests hollows are scarce resulting in less diverse and smaller populations of forest animals
  • Many understorey plants flourish after fires and are often older than the dominant eucalypts which may be killed in an intense fire
  • Weed infestation
  • Predation of native animals by introduced species
  • Phytophthora cinnamomi (fungal dieback)

Where to see wet forests and rainforests

Sambar deer in the Alpine National Park Click to view the news RSS feed.

Deer control trial for a healthier Alpine National Park

27 Jul 2015

Parks Victoria, in partnership with the Sporting Shooters Association of Australia (SSAA) and the Australian Deer Association (ADA), have begun a three year trial deer control program to limit environmental damage deer are causing in the Alpine National Park. This trial is the first of its kind in the park…

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What's on for 2015-2016 at Albert Park

1 Jul 2015 12:00am - 30 Jun 2016 12:00am

A wide variety of events are held at Albert Park throughout the year. Events range from fun runs and sporting tournaments to other community events. See the full calendar here.

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Hooded Plovers Naturewise Experience

29 Jul 2015 8:30am - 31 Jul 2015 5:30pm

On this exclusive Naturewise trip you will be working alongside Parks Victoria Rangers and conservation experts on a critical Hooded Plover habitat restoration projects including hands-on removal of sea spurge, establishing photo monitoring points, and recording data on any Hooded Plover activity. You will also experience the best of the…

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GMBC Winter NFF 2015, Round 8

31 Jul 2015 6:00pm-8:30pm

Round 8 of GMBC Winter NFF 2015 series. MTB trails in use in Kurrajong.

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Healesville/Coranderrk Walk: Learn about Wurundjeri history & Coranderrk Mission

3 Aug 2015 2:00pm-4:00pm

During Wurundjeri Week, Wurundjeri Council will be running various tours on Wurundjeri Country to educate the public on different aspects of Indigenous and Wurundjeri culture. Coranderrk Mission still holds great significance to the Wurundjeri people as well as tribes of the Kulin Nation. Discover how it came about, the people…