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Wet forests and rainforest

Powerful Owl (Photo: J. Tscharke)

Powerful Owl (Photo: J. Tscharke)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

Bracket Fungus (Photo: Mark Antos)

Bracket Fungus (Photo: Mark Antos)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

Central Highlands Spiny Crayfish (photo: M. Antos)

Central Highlands Spiny Crayfish (photo: M. Antos)

Photo by: Parks Victoria

Location: Wet forests and rainforest

The cool mountains and gullies of ranges in southern, central and north-eastern Victoria as well as areas at lower elevations are dominated by wet eucalypt forests and rainforests.

The wet eucalypt forests have Victoria’s tallest trees including the world’s largest flowering plant, the Mountain Ash which reaches up to 100 metres in height and 15 metres in circumference. This often grows in single species stands, but Messmate and Mountain Grey Gum, or Shining Gum and Alpine Ash at higher altitudes, and other eucalypts share the sky.

In rainforests and sheltered gullies a dense canopy of non-eucalypt tree species, climbers, broad-leafed shrubs and tree ferns provide umbrellas of shade for a variety of ferns, shrubs, mosses and myriad of other life-forms.

More about wet forests and rainforests

  • Generally Myrtle Beech rainforests only form once a wet eucalypt forest reaches maturity, which takes several hundred years to do so.
  • Trees in wet forests begin to develop hollows in trunks and larger branches after they are about 150 years old.
  • Possums (such as the rare Leadbeater’s Possum), gliders, bats, owls and many bird species require tree hollows or standing dead trees for nesting or roosting or both.

Key Threats

  • In young forests hollows are scarce resulting in less diverse and smaller populations of forest animals.
  • Many understorey plants flourish after fires and are often older than the dominant eucalypts which may be killed in an intense fire.
  • Weed infestation.
  • Predation of native animals by introduced species.
  • Phytophthora cinnamomi (fungal dieback).

Where to see wet forests and rainforests

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Sharing the Love for Marine Protected Areas

12 Aug 2016

All things fishy are being celebrated in Warrnambool this weekend, with marine volunteers across the state gathering at Deakin University for the third Sharing the Love forum. Friends of Merri Marine Sanctuary and Parks Victoria are hosting the event, which celebrates and supports community involvement in Victoria’s marine national parks…

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Wattle Day

28 Aug 2016 10:00am-2:00pm

The Friends of Braeside Park invite the community to visit and experience Wattle Day at the Community Garden and Nursery Facility. Follow the signs after entering the Park from Lower Dandenong Road, Braeside. Take the opportunity to attend and learn about local native plants, protecting and enhancing our environment and…

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10 Annual Kooyoora Wildflower Show

17 Sep 2016 9:00am - 18 Sep 2016 4:00pm

The 10 Annual Kooyoora Wildflower Show is on September 17 and 18 at the Inglewood Eucalyptus Museum. Gates open at 9am each day and close at 4pm. $5 entry for adults with children U18 free. The event includes static wildflower displays, twice daily guided bus tours to Kooyoora State Park,…

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Science In The Park - Dinosaurs Great & Small

19 Sep 2016 9:00am-10:30am

PrimeSCI! activity for years 3-6. Become a palaeontologist for the day! What can fossils show us about the diet of dinosaurs? Why did they have claws? Lesson includes a tour of the Victorian Polar Dinosaur display in the Coolart Homestead.

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Science In the Park - Brilliant Birds

19 Sep 2016 9:00am-10:30am

Brilliant Birds - PrimeSCI! activity for Prep - Year 2 students. Work in the field and identify our unique native birds. Record their numbers and find out if they are common or rare. Most importantly, understand their needs to survive and how they can be protected.