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Emergency markers

Emergency markers have been installed in a number of metropolitan parks. Refer to the "Precautions" section of individual parks' pages to find parks that have emergency markers.

What are emergency markers?

Emergency markers are green signs with white writing that are about the same size as a street sign. They may be found fixed to existing structures, such as a buildings or lamp posts, or attached to purpose-built bollards. These markers can be used to help the Emergency Services Telecommunications Authority (ESTA – managers of the "000" dispatch system) identify the location of emergency calls.

These signs include a unique alphanumeric number (e.g. LYS 201) that is linked to ESTA's computer-aided dispatch system. This reference number will help emergency services arrive at the required location as quickly as possible.

emergency-marker

How do emergency markers work?

ESTA's complete ability to direct emergency services to exact emergency caller locations is critical. The alphanumeric markers can be quoted by Triple Zero (000) callers to help determine exactly where they are and identify the closest access point.

The two most pivotal pieces of information required when calling 000 are the location of the emergency (where is it?) and the nature of the emergency (what is it?). When an emergency marker is quoted, ESTA's 000 transmitter can then provide specific navigational information to the responding emergency services.

Emergency markers are much more than just a sign. They are supported by GPS co-ordinates and directional instructions enabling ESTA conductors to provide directional information to police, fire, ambulance and the State Emergency Service advising them of obstructions such as locked gates, road closures and quickest access points.

For more information about emergency markers go to www.esta.vic.gov.au

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