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Bunyip State Park

Tall Grass Tree
from Robert Higgins
 
Wildlife
from Jacinta Hurst
 
Idiots
from Jacinta Hurst
 
Lawson Falls
from Angela Louise Strickland
 
Magnificent Mountain Ash
from Andrew
 
Fabulous Ferns
from Andrew
 
Fabulous Ferns
from Andrew
 
Fabulous Ferns
from Andrew
 
Fabulous Fungi
from Andrew
 
portrait of a black swan at Devil,s bend
from Rudolf Brink
 
Sword-grass Brown butterfly on Ferres walking
from Phil Skeggs
 
Yellow-tailed black cockatoo chewing bark
from Phil Skeggs
 
Waterhole beside Silvertop Ridge Track
from Phil Skeggs
 
Red Fungi, Ferres Track
from Saskia
 
Bunyip
from Wayne
 
Bunyip
from Wayne
 
Bunyip – SW Area
from Wayne
 
Bunyip – SW Area
from Wayne
 
At 4 Brothers Rocks
from Parks Victoria
 
Black Snake Range
from Wayne
 
Watsons TK
from Wayne
 
Four Brothers Rock
from Wayne
 
Brown Koala
from Wayne
 
Triangle Rd
from Wayne
 
Windy Point
from Wayne
 
Button Grass Walk
from Parks Victoria
 

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Park Statistics

Camp fires
Camping
Cycling
Four wheel driving
Horse riding
Medium walk / Day walk
Mountain biking
Picnicking
Short walk
Sight-seeing
Trail bike riding

In February 2009, 45 per cent of Bunyip State Park was burnt by wildfire. Despite this dramatic event this park is once again an amazing escape where you can breathe fresh air and enjoy native plants and animals.

See a mosiac of green from heathland on river plains to Mountain Ash forest covering steep slopes. Whatever recreational pursuit you enjoy, Bunyip State Park provides opportunities for all.

The legend of the bunyip

Beware of the Bunyip, a dark furry animal with a round face, small ears and fiery eyes that glow in the dark!

According to the Aboriginal people, the Bunyip or “Buneep” (as spelt on early maps which show the river, first cattle run and township) is a spirit that punishes bad people.

Local Aboriginal people believed the Bunyip lived in the swamps of the Bunyip River, and therefore avoided the area. Many early settlers, believing this story, never pitched their tents near a ‘Bunyip hole’. People were also careful not to make ripples when collecting water. This upset the Bunyip. 

Aboriginal Traditional Owners

Parks Victoria acknowledges the Aboriginal Traditional Owners of Victoria - including its parks and reserves. Through their cultural traditions, Aboriginal people maintain their connection to their ancestral lands and waters. Further information is available from Aboriginal Affairs Victoria AAV and Native Title Services Victoria

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Popular things to do

  • Camping Fees do not apply to these campgrounds. No bookings are taken for campgrounds where fees do not apply. Camping is…

  • Heritage Horse Trail Horse riding is a great way to explore the distinctive bush atmosphere of Bunyip State Park and nearby Kurth Kiln…

  • Walking Suggested short walks1. Mortimer Nature Walk1.2km, 45 minutes return, easyA self-guided nature walk introducing the plants, animals and other features…

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