You are here

Home > About > News and media releases > Grampians crawling with wildlife and researchers

News

Growling Grass Frog (photo: Museum Victoria)

Growling Grass Frog (photo: Museum Victoria)

2 years ago from Unknown LDAP UserParks Victoria

Filming scorpion (photo: Museum Victoria)

Filming scorpion (photo: Museum Victoria)

2 years ago from Unknown LDAP UserParks Victoria

Eastern Pygmy Possum (photo: Museum Victoria)

Eastern Pygmy Possum (photo: Museum Victoria)

2 years ago from Unknown LDAP UserParks Victoria

Cicada (photo: Museum Victoria)

Cicada (photo: Museum Victoria)

2 years ago from Unknown LDAP UserParks Victoria

Red-bellied Black Snake (photo: Museum Victoria)

Red-bellied Black Snake (photo: Museum Victoria)

2 years ago from Unknown LDAP UserParks Victoria

Scorpion (photo: Museum Victoria)

Scorpion (photo: Museum Victoria)

2 years ago from Unknown LDAP UserParks Victoria

Jo Summner with Stumpy-tail (photo: Museum Victoria)

Jo Summner with Stumpy-tail (photo: Museum Victoria)

2 years ago from Unknown LDAP UserParks Victoria

Richard Marchant and Ryan Duffy with aquatic insects (photo: Museum Victoria)

Richard Marchant and Ryan Duffy with aquatic insects (photo: Museum Victoria)

2 years ago from Unknown LDAP UserParks Victoria

Grampians crawling with wildlife and researchers

Tuesday 27 November, 2012

A team of Parks Victoria rangers and Museum Victoria scientists have joined forces to perform an extensive biodiversity scan of the Grampians – one of Victoria’s most loved parks.

A huge survey of the wildlife of one of Victoria's most spectacular national parks is currently underway in western Victoria. The Grampians Bioscan is a collaboration between Parks Victoria and Museum Victoria where more than 60 museum researchers and 20 rangers are spending two weeks peering into every nook and cranny of this iconic park and adjacent state parks.

Dr Mark Norman, Head of Sciences at Museum Victoria, said researchers are using a wide range of techniques from pitfall and small mammal traps, to audible and ultrasonic sound recorders, flying insect traps, mist nets, night frog surveys, scuba diving, moth light stations and direct searching to document the wildlife of the region.

More than 85 bird species, 23 reptiles, 22 mammals and 9 frog species have been found so far, each photographed, filmed or documented in some form. Highlights include discovery of many species considered rare or endangered elsewhere around the state and country, including healthy numbers of:

  • Two species of endangered native rodents, the Smoky Mouse and Heath Mouse
  • The Mountain Dragon, known only from a couple of museum specimens
  • The Swamp Skink, not recorded since the 1970s
  • The Glenelg Spiny Crayfish protected due to past overfishing
  • The Growling Grass Frog threatened elsewhere by urban development
  • Three species of marsupial mice – Agile, Yellow-footed and Dusky Antechinus
  • The Eastern Pygmy Possum

For other animal groups, discoveries include:

  • Fluorescing scorpions and carnivorous land snails
  • The snake-like Lined Worm Lizard.
  • The Western Swamp Crayfish (Australia’s Smallest Crayfish at a ‘huge’ 40mm long).

“Good numbers of native animals in Black Range State Park in particular are an excellent sign that the fox-baiting program run by Parks Victoria is working,” said Dr Norman.

Ranger in Charge David Roberts said the partnership with Museum Victoria staff and students had been extremely successful.

“We love working in the Grampians National Park, and seeing these kind of results is extremely gratifying to staff who have managed the park through fire and flood over the past decade,” said Mr Roberts.

“Protecting and enhancing biodiversity within the park is central to what we do, so we’re obviously all very pleased to see the rich wildlife on show through the survey.”

Mr Roberts said not all the finds have been small animals - the researchers have been entertained by Emu fathers managing adolescent chicks, huge Lace Monitor goannas and some seriously large Tiger and Red-bellied Black Snakes.

The team has been aided with insect identification by members of the Entomological Society of Victoria and for plants by the staff of the National Herbarium of Victoria.

The survey continues until 29 November with the resulting images, video, data and stories being made widely available for education, conservation and management purposes.

The Grampians survey follows last year’s bioscan at Wilsons Promontory National Park, where more than 700 animal species were recorded, including animals previously unseen at the Prom.

What's on

Click to view RSS Feed

Summer No Frills Friday

28 Nov 2014 7:00pm-8:30pm

Fun, low key Mountain Bike racing suitable for beginner racers and juniors (13yrs and over)

Click to view RSS Feed

Westerfolds parkrun

29 Nov 2014 8:00am-9:00am

parkrun is free, weekly, 5km timed run that is open to everyone - walkers, runners, families and dogs are all welcome! Westerfolds parkrun occurs every Saturday morning. We're based near the main carpark off the Fitzsimons Lane entrance, and the course is run entirely on sealed paths within the park.

Click to view RSS Feed

Portsea Craft Market

30 Nov 2014 9:00am-2:00pm

Located in one of the Victoria's most picturesque settings, Point Nepean near Portsea. Soak in the exceptional atmosphere and regenerate your senses at this delightful market that specialises on local produce and home made wares. There is something for everyone from old world to modern contemporary, a labyrinth of unique…

Click to view RSS Feed

The Melbourne Mega Bat Count

3 Dec 2014

The Grey-headed Flying-fox is the largest flying-fox (also known as a fruit bat) species in Australia. Each month the Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology conduct the monthly bat count at Yarra Bend Park at dusk on the Wednesday evening closest to the risen full moon. This data is critical…